Wild Inspiration Reading List: The Sacred Balance.

One of my very favourites for an inspiration-less day is David Suzuki’s The Sacred Balance. Where many environmental themed books are dull and saddening this is uplifting and joyful. Something I really need for time to time. I took away from this book of feeling of connection and conversely feeling like such a small speck in the universe, but in a really good way. When it all feels like too much, this is a good one to open at random and take in.

The Scared Balance

The Sacred Balance: Rediscovering Our Place in Nature

This special 10th anniversary edition re-examines our place in the natural world in light of the sweeping environmental changes and the recent advances in scientific knowledge.

Since its first publication, Sacred Balance has sold over 100,000 copies. In the meantime, global warming has become a major issue as glaciers and polar ice caps have begun to melt at an alarming rate, populations of polar bears have dwindled, the intensity of hurricanes and tsunamis has drastically increased, coral bleaching is occurring globally, and the earth has experienced its hottest years in over four centuries. At the same time, scientists have made significant discoveries about the current state of the Great Lakes and other ecosystems of the world; the science behind the mother/baby interaction and the relationship between deprivation of affection in childhood and serious illness in midlife; the workings of the brain, including its ability to create a narrative, anticipate the future, and order the past; and the biological underpinnings of religion, among other findings. In this new and extensively revised and amplified edition of his best-selling book, David Suzuki reflects on these changes and examines what they mean for our place in the world.

The basic message of this seminal, best-selling work remains the same: We are creatures of the earth, and as such, we are utterly dependent on its gifts of air, water, soil, and the energy of the sun. These elements are not just external factors; we take them into our bodies, where they are incorporated into our very essence. What replenishes the air, water, and soil and captures sunlight to vitalize the biosphere is the diverse web of all beings. The recently completed human genome project has revealed that all species are our biological kin, related to us through our evolutionary history. And it appears that our need for their company is programmed into our genome.

As social animals, we have an absolute need for love; without it, we suffer dire psychological and physical consequences. The strength of that love is reflected in healthy, vibrant families and communities supported by full employment, security, and justice and free of threats of genocide, terror, or war. Finally, we have spiritual needs, which are ultimately rooted in nature, the source of our inspiration and belonging. These are the real requirements of all humanity and should form the basis of any society aspiring to a truly sustainable future.

These truths remain. But the cataclysmic events of the last decade require that we rethink our behaviour and find a new way to live in balance with our surroundings. This book offers just such a new direction for us all.

David Suzuki donates his royalties from sales of The Sacred Balance to the David Suzuki Foundation.

Wild Inspiration Reading List: The Sacred Balance.

One of my very favourites for an inspiration-less day is David Suzuki’s The Sacred Balance. Where many environmental themed books are dull and saddening this is uplifting and joyful. Something I really need for time to time. I took away from this book of feeling of connection and conversely feeling like such a small speck in the universe, but in a really good way. When it all feels like too much, this is a good one to open at random and take in.

The Scared Balance

The Sacred Balance: Rediscovering Our Place in Nature

This special 10th anniversary edition re-examines our place in the natural world in light of the sweeping environmental changes and the recent advances in scientific knowledge.

Since its first publication, Sacred Balance has sold over 100,000 copies. In the meantime, global warming has become a major issue as glaciers and polar ice caps have begun to melt at an alarming rate, populations of polar bears have dwindled, the intensity of hurricanes and tsunamis has drastically increased, coral bleaching is occurring globally, and the earth has experienced its hottest years in over four centuries. At the same time, scientists have made significant discoveries about the current state of the Great Lakes and other ecosystems of the world; the science behind the mother/baby interaction and the relationship between deprivation of affection in childhood and serious illness in midlife; the workings of the brain, including its ability to create a narrative, anticipate the future, and order the past; and the biological underpinnings of religion, among other findings. In this new and extensively revised and amplified edition of his best-selling book, David Suzuki reflects on these changes and examines what they mean for our place in the world.

The basic message of this seminal, best-selling work remains the same: We are creatures of the earth, and as such, we are utterly dependent on its gifts of air, water, soil, and the energy of the sun. These elements are not just external factors; we take them into our bodies, where they are incorporated into our very essence. What replenishes the air, water, and soil and captures sunlight to vitalize the biosphere is the diverse web of all beings. The recently completed human genome project has revealed that all species are our biological kin, related to us through our evolutionary history. And it appears that our need for their company is programmed into our genome.

As social animals, we have an absolute need for love; without it, we suffer dire psychological and physical consequences. The strength of that love is reflected in healthy, vibrant families and communities supported by full employment, security, and justice and free of threats of genocide, terror, or war. Finally, we have spiritual needs, which are ultimately rooted in nature, the source of our inspiration and belonging. These are the real requirements of all humanity and should form the basis of any society aspiring to a truly sustainable future.

These truths remain. But the cataclysmic events of the last decade require that we rethink our behaviour and find a new way to live in balance with our surroundings. This book offers just such a new direction for us all.

David Suzuki donates his royalties from sales of The Sacred Balance to the David Suzuki Foundation.

New Year, New Inspiration

Looking for a burst of wild inspiration for the new year? Maybe it’s time to take on something new!

Here’s a few ideas for some extracurricular things in Perth that you might be interested in taking on;

UWA extension – One of my personal favourites, you can sign up for classes in everything from cheese making to rocket science or do a course online too (languages, adobe programs and other work related skills). I did a Supervision and Management one not that long ago and it was a great experience and because it’s from UWA it looks relatively legit on the CV. Here is a link to the program to get you excited.

Central TAFE Short Courses – How does a french class after work sound? or perhaps guitar lessons or fabric screen printing? You can even learn how to sew your own knickers on monday nights. The campus is only a 5-10 minute walk from St Georges Tce.

Polytechnic West – TAFE Short Courses – These guys have a few campuses around Perth including Bentley, Victoria Park and Midland. With languages, singing, massage, art, cooking, I’m sure you’ll find something there that pikes your interest.

Challenger – TAFE Short Courses – for those of you in the south of Perth (Freo, Applecross, Bibra Lake, Murdoch, Rockingham, Mandurah) Challenger TAFE have short courses near you. A bit of an odd mix of things on offer here.

Fancy doing something creative but don’t want to be told what to do? Check out Art Jamming with The Art Things. Pippa runs workshops in the park (currently in South Perth or Kalamunda) where you can go along and throw some paint at a canvas, and dance or picnic or whatever else you want to do whilst you’re at it. Great fun.

Want to learn how to give your hunny toe curling massage? Jenny Sherwood runs workshops and classes from a her studio on Canning Hwy, Victoria Park. She’s a bit sharp but a powerful teacher. Look out for coupons/deals for this one.

How about Yoga? Yeah its excercise but if you’ve never tried it before it’s quite a learning curve. Perfect for expanding your point of view. Best yoga teacher I’ve found in Perth is Sue Byrne. runs classes throughout the week in Cannington.

Also check out scoopon et al. for deals, recently I’ve seen rock climbing, and scuba diving.

Any others I’ve missed? Send them through!

As mentioned in my previous post, I’m about to start sketching classes (enrolments open tomorrow), can’t wait!

What are you taking on in 2013?

 

 

Link: Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are

Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate

Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Off To Market

Speaking with my wonderful partner last night about how active and healthy we are, and came to the conclusion that I, in particular, have let this, a huge part of my lifestyle, fall by the wayside.

I’m going to assign this to the extraordinary whirlwind lifestyle we have created for ourselves, we are out all the time exploring and just being in this amazing relationship – so this is by no means a negative thing.

Not 6 months ago I was a regular gym attendee, yoga enthusiast, avid bush walker, and spent almost every Sunday morning at my local farmers market picking up my fresh and organic veggies, meat and bread. Letting these things go, ever so slowly,  has just resulted in a severe drop in my well being.

I adore the farmers market, especially in winter, wrapping myself up in my red winter coat , gathering my African woven basket and assorted bags, and taking off, wondering at my own pace through the bright, energetic crowd. Everything is so fresh, colourful, real, and fragrant. My pickings for the week come from all over the market based  on the best looking, freshest, friendliest farmer, and best price coming together to create a gorgeous basket full of colour and texture. Before munching on a yummy almond croissant from the french baker,  and lugging my full basket home.

Without the market I quickly loose inspiration to cook during the week, supermarkets drain my soul. Getting inspired to create amazing, fresh and healthy meals is so very easy when your surrounded by the best vegetables, and the most amazing herbs – and its cheaper too!!

an interesting wikihow article I found about eating organic food, without it being incredibly expensive;

http://www.wikihow.com/Eat-Organically-on-Modest-Means

so! The point of this post was not to tell you about farmers markets – because I could talk for days and days about markets, and perhaps what i’ll do is another blog post to this effect if your interested. When I travel local markets are a major priority for me, especially in small rural towns as a centre of the community and in big cities as their link to the land, so I have stories and photos to show a plenty. I’ve studied markets from a planning and ecology point of view, how they effect communities, for their purposes as a point of connection to where your food comes from and the landscape we live on, etc etc.

The point of this post was to say, I’m taking on getting back into those things that I love and inspire me. Sunday morning markets, Monday afternoon gym, Thursday afternoon yoga, weekend bush walking :) I’m so excited about it, I’m energised and so very keen to get started. The best part about this will be having my incredible Luke along for the ride. Can’t wait to take him out in the bush with me so I can share with him why I’m an enviro, and my source of inspiration! Can you believe its 7 months into our relationship and we haven’t been out in the bush yet!? How am I still breathing? Its such a huge part of who I am.